Hapkido Ki Breathing by Andrea Stone

December 1, 2009

Hapkido Ki Breathing (DanJun Hohup)

By Action Radio Network Spokes Model, Andrea Stone, Hapkido Black Belt at the American Dragon Martial Arts Academies in Clermont, Florida, certified by the Korean Hapkido Federation.

Hapkido Ki Breathing is an essential part of the Hapkido system. In the martial art of Hapkido we breath in, inhale, to build or develop Ki energy and we breath out, exhale, to move Ki energy. This allow the Hapkido practitioner to apply the moving Ki energy to their techniques. The Haemukwan Hapkido system is well know for this application of Ki energy in all of the techniques.

Hapkido Ki Breathing Exercise #1

To the Front

Step 1:  Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart with your knees facing straight forward. Bend your knees slightly so you are almost in a horse-back-riding stance.  Tilt your pelvis forward so that your back is straightened and all your Ki centers are aligned, look straight ahead.

Step 2: For the first breath, inhale deeply, through your nose, bringing your hands up to your chest, with you fingers curled slightly to cup your hands.

Step 3: On the exhale, bend you knees further into the horse-riding stance so that you lower yourself straight down. At the same time, push your arms straight out in front of you, keeping your hands verticals, with palms parallel to each other.

Step 4: As you finish exhaling straighten back up and bring your hands back to chest level. 

Hapkido Ki Breathing Exercises #2

Upwards

Step 1:  Stand with your feet shoulder-length apart with your knees facing straight forward. Bend your knees slightly so you are almost in a horse-back-riding stance.  Tilt your pelvis forward so that your back is straightened and all your Ki centers are aligned, look straight ahead.

Step 2: For the first breath, inhale deeply, through your nose, bringing your hands up to your chest, with you fingers curled slightly to cup your hands.

Step 3: On the exhale, bend you knees further into the horse-riding stance so that you lower yourself straight down. At the same time, push your arms up, with your palms facing away from you. Your index fingers and thumbs should create the shape of a triangle. Bring your arms straight up over your head, as you look through the triangle. When you’ve reached tup as far as you can, you should have about finished exhaling, at which point you should lower your arms back to the resting position.

Hapkido Ki Breathing Exercise #3

Downwards

Step 1:  Stand with your feet shoulder-length apart with your knees facing straight forward. Bend your knees slightly so you are almost in a horse-back-riding stance.  Tilt your pelvis forward so that your back is straightened and all your Ki centers are aligned, look straight ahead.

Step 2: For the first breath, inhale deeply, through your nose, bringing your hands up to your chest, with you fingers curled slightly to cup your hands.

Step 3: On the exhale, bend you knees further into the horse-back-riding stance so that you lower yourself straight down. At the same time, turn your hands so palms face downward, with your index fingers and thumbs recreating the triangle shape from exercise 2. When you have pushed your arms all the way down, turn your palms outward, so that the backs of your hands are facing each other (thumbs down). Then rotate your hands back to the standard position and bring them straight up and straighten back into the standard resting position.  

Hapkido Ki Breathing Exercise #4

Outwards

Step 1:  Stand with your feet shoulder-length apart with your knees facing straight forward. Bend your knees slightly so you are almost in a horse-back-riding stance.  Tilt your pelvis forward so that your back is straightened and all your Ki centers are aligned, look straight ahead.

Step 2: For the first breath, inhale deeply, through your nose, bringing your hands up to your chest, with you fingers curled slightly to cup your hands.

Step 3: On the exhale, bend you knees further into the horse-back-riding stance so that you lower yourself straight down. At the same time push your arms out to your sides, as if trying to hold open the doors of an elevator manually. Once fully extended, rotate your wrists so that your hands are now thumbs-down. Keeping your elbows slightly locked, bring your arms back to the front, and when they meet in front of you, turn your hands so that your palms are parallel, and bring your arms back to the standard resting position.

About the author: Andrea Stone is a Black Belt in Haemukwan Hapkido at the American Dragon Martial Arts Academies in Clermont, Florida. She is also the official Spokes Model for the Action Radio Network and an honors student at East Ridge High School in Clermont, Florida.

www.americandragononline.com   www.haemukwan.com   www.actionradio.net   www.worldmartialartsnetwork.ning.com

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Pre Class Meditation for Martial Arts

August 17, 2009

Pre-Class Meditation for Martial Artists

In the traditional martial art of Hapkido we focus on three primary areas of develop. The mind, body and spirit. With pre class meditation is one way to develop all three. When one participates in pre-class meditation it does several things. For one, as you meditate, it lowers your heart rate and relaxes you both mentally and physically. This prepares the body for the work out you are about to engage in. Pre-class meditation is also a form of relieving stress, which is both beneficial to the mind, body and spirit.

Most pre class meditation is performed by sitting with your legs crossed on the floor, place your fists on your knees, with your back straight and your head held up. It is important to remember to always have good posture. This means no slouching! Slowly inhale through your nose and exhale through the mouth respectively. Take deep, slow breaths. Concentrate on clearing your mind and relaxing your heart rate.

Visualization is an important part of pre-class meditation. I visualize a river flowing or an ocean with waves breaking on the shore. As I slowly inhale and exhale, I try to mentally slow the river down to a stop, or try and make the waves of the ocean stop, depending on which mental image I’ve chosen. The total concentration of trying to make the waves stop shuts out all other daily distractions, allowing me to focus entirely on my meditation, and for a little while forget the daily stress of life. 

Pre-Class meditation benefits your martial arts training because it develops your mind, body and spirit. Pre-Class meditation has a number of health and psychological benefits. Because it reduces stress, it can put you in a good mood, making your martial arts training more enjoyable for you. It also lowers your heart rate, which is beneficial to your body, so that you may participate in class at a greater ease.

About the author: Andrea Stone is a multi-arts black belt and the Teen Spokes Model for www.actionradio.net appearing in their ads worldwide. See is currently a martial arts student at the American Dragon Martial Arts Academies and an advanced placement honors student Junior at East Ridge High School in Clermont, Florida.

www.actionradio.net   www.haemukwan.com   www.worldmartialartsmagazine.com


Martial Arts Article by Hapkido Instructor Dr. Ron Stone

July 7, 2009

MUTUAL RESPECT AND HUMILITY IN THE MARTIAL ARTS 

      This past weekend I had the pleasure of attending the Action Radio Network & World Martial Arts Magazine’s Hall of Fame Awards gala event in Clearwater Beach, Florida.  Merely sitting in the same room with over a hundred and fifty of the greatest martial arts grandmasters in the world was truly an amazing experience.  Never was the expression “Be there or Be square” more true.

      I wish I could report that I was there to be honored with a plaque, a standing ovation or something equally impressive, but the truth is that after almost forty years in and out of the martial arts I am now known simply as Andrea Stone’s father.  Although I went home empty handed I guess you could say that in effect I was honored, but it was to watch my beautiful 16 year old daughter receive the Female Role Model of the Year Award.

      I could brag about my triple martial arts black belt teenager all day and night (just as I can about her sister) but that isn’t the point of this article.  What I would like to point out is the consistent level of humility and mutual respect I witnessed that night from the most revered men and women in the martial arts industry.  Not one of the recipients accepted their award without somehow paying respect to another martial arts instructor, friend, mentor or role model.  Some were even humble enough to realize that we all need to be reminded occasionally that we are nothing without God’s good graces.

      Several things occurred that night that I feel are worthy of mention.  The first was that many of the grandmasters, like Kim Kahana, who have a lifetime of achievement in the arts seemed truly honored.  The smiles on their faces when they received their awards indicated to me that this was not just another day at the dojo.  After thirty, forty, and even fifty years in the martial arts an outsider might suppose that such things would become commonplace, but I suspect that these men and women feel like they are just getting started.  To become a grandmaster in the first place one has to be either a flaming type A personality, a supreme overachiever or the most stubborn no-quitter on the planet.  Such people are never complacent.  Such artists will never rest on their laurels.  Believe me, you could do worse than to spend a evening interacting with such people.

       Earlier, on the way to the event, I commented to my daughter Andrea that she would probably meet some other kids her age.  One teenager I mentioned was Dominique Zaino, a member of Team America.  Dominique is a pretty and talented young lady who hosts her own martial arts radio show on the Action Radio Network.  When my daughter mentioned her apprehension at meeting her I was surprised and asked what the problem was.  “Girls that pretty and talented are usually stuck up and stand offish,” was her caustic reply.  For reasons I can’t fathom my daughter didn’t see herself in that same “pretty and talented” category.

On the drive home Andrea couldn’t stop raving about what a nice girl Dominque turned out to be and how “Down to Earth” she was.  “I didn’t think I’d like her but she sure fooled me,” was repeated several times.  After meeting the Zaino family I’m sure Dominque went home saying the same thing about Andrea.  You see those who grow up in the martial arts quickly learn to set aside pride and self importance.  The first thing you learn in any martial arts style is that no matter how good you are there is always someone out there who is better.  An exaggerated sense of self importance quickly goes out the door.  One only has to remember the basic Tenents of Tae Kwon Do to realize that their mutual experience was a classic example of that: 

Couresy (Ye Ul)

Integrity (Yom Chi)

Perseverance (In Nae)

Self Control (Guk Gi)

Indomitable Spirit (Baekjul Boolgool)

            Finally, along these same lines was a comment made to me by Hapkido Grandmaster Gary Pointer.  He was relating some of his philosophy and he too constantly made reference to friends and former martial arts and Hapkido instructors.  One point I was impressed with was his concept that each of us are inter related with respect to our training and abilities.  In other words, “one man does not a martial art make”.  The strength of a martial art comes with the constant interaction of students and teacher.  The strength of the martial arts community comes not with the separation of styles but with mutual respect and recognition.  In the paraphrased words of Jet Li from the movie Fearless, competition is not about beating each other but about learning from each other what works and what doesn’t.

            When I mentioned to Hapkido Grandmaster Pointer that I felt a little out of place since I was only a second dan in Hapkido  his reply was classic.  “That is not what or who you are.  Your rank is just what you were awarded or achieved so far.  You have learned far more from your life’s experiences than your rank Hapkido indicates.”   With all this man’s achievements and rank he could have very easily been dismissive or condescending, yet I found him to be considerate and polite.  That’s what I love about the martial arts.  Where else could you spend years learning to be more and more dangerous while at the same time turning into someone polite, kind and considerate.

             Now my goal is to go to one of these history making martial arts events and have people comment.

“Wow I didn’t expect someone so handsome and talented to be so down to earth.”

Hope to see you at next year’s event. 

Ron Stone

www.actionradio.net   www.worldmartialartsmagazine.com   www.haemukwan.com


From the South Lake Press News Paper in Clermont, Florida

January 7, 2009

At a Hapkido school in Clermont, Florida a 15 Year Old Girl Earns Third Black Belt!

self defense class clermont florida

Clermont, Florida Hapkido Black Belt Andrea Stone

Andrea Marie Stone, a 15 year old student at East Ridge High School in Clermont, Florida recently earned a black belt in her third martial art.  Having previously achieved 1st degree rank in the Korean martial arts of TaeKwondo and TangSooDo, Andrea switched to Hapkido when her family moved to Clermont from Miami.

“I could have continued on with TaeKwondo, but I prefer the more realistic self defense training that Hapkido offers.  It’s not a sport or a stylistic art, but rather a reality based self defense system for both men and women.  It’s what they teach the Korean police and Special forces. I visited and trained at every martial arts school in Clermont, Florida and was lucky to find the best school.”

Andrea trains in Clermont at the American Dragon Martial Arts Academy, located at 1158 Fifth Street in Clermont.  Her instructor, Master Mi Yi, is a sixth degree internationally reknown expert and co founder of the DukHoKwan style of Hapkido.  She also holds a fifth degree in Tae Kwon do and offers instruction in either art for both adults and children, as well as offering an after school program.

hapkido school in clermont florida

Hapkido Black Belt Andrea Stone of Clermont, Florida

“I like training under a Korean instructor,” Andrea explained.  “You get a more accurate explanation of what the moves mean and how they are supposed to be applied.  I have been doing this since I was five and can really tell the difference.  Of course I’m still learning, but I do know that you don’t want any mistakes or have any misconceptions when it comes to self defense training. That is why I want to learn from the best.”

For further information on th best Hapkido or TaeKwonDo training you can contact the American Dragon Martial Arts Academy in Clermont, Florida. Ph 352-536-1122.
www.americandragononline.com   www.actionradio.net   www.haemukwan.com   www.worldmartialartsmagazine.com